CONSUMERS

What We’ve Read: Calvin Klein to Close Luxury Collections Business

by

Cléa Emery

|

This is the featured image caption
Credit: This is the featured image credit

Luxury Society’s selection of news articles that are not to be missed this week.

Over the last decade, collaborations between luxury brands and contemporary artists have gone beyond mere artistic partnerships towards a new kind of luxury branding.

PARIS – Art and fashion have always developed side by side, for fashion, like art, often gives visual expression to the cultural zeitgeist. During the 1920s, Salvador Dalí created dresses for Coco Chanel and Elsa Schiapparelli. In the 1930s, Ferragamo’s shoes commissioned designs for advertisements from Futurist painter Lucio Venna, while Gianni Versace commissioned works from artists such as Alighiero Boetti and Roy Lichtenstein for the launch of his collections. Yves Saint Laurent’s vast art collection, recently auctioned at Christie’s in Paris, testified to his great love of art and revealed the influence of a variety of artists on his own designs.

In the 1980s, relationships between luxury brands and artists were advanced when Alain Dominique Perrin created the Fondation Cartier. In the Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain, a book marking the foundation’s 20th anniversary, Perrin says he makes “a connection between all the different sorts of arts, and luxury goods are a kind of art. Luxury goods are handicrafts of art, applied art.”

The Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemparain building in Paris

Luxury Society’s selection of news articles that are not to be missed this week.

1. Calvin Klein to close luxury collections business

The American fashion brand Calvin Klein has announced that it is shutting its luxury collections business. It will instead focus on its existing categories, including denim and underwear.

Read this on The Guardian.

2. Luxury fashion continues its mission to support women

As the world turns to embrace women and push for equality, luxury brands are participating in full force for this year’s International Women’s Day to show that supporting the gender is an integral part of their businesses.

Read this on Luxury Daily.

3. How to create an authentic luxury experience for millennials

Recently, a CEO of a luxury brand asked me if I would agree that for millennials, especially in China and Asia, luxury is all about experiences, suggesting that brand, quality, and craftsmanship were not nearly as important. That in today’s digital — everything all of the time — world, it’s all about connection.

Read this on Jing Daily.

4. Luxury Defies China Slowdown Fears

From Richemont to Kering, some of the biggest names in luxury reported strong growth in their end-of-year results, with the majority citing the Chinese market as a key driver.

Read this on Business of Fashion.

5. How What Goes Around Comes Around is attracting millennials to buy vintage

What Goes Around Comes Around (WGACA) is making luxury vintage cool again for the millennial buyer. Known as the premier destination for the finest collectible luxury vintage from around the world with an unrivaled selection of designer accessories and clothing from brands such as Chanel, Hermès, Louis Vuitton, Gucci, Versace, Dior and Fendi.

Read this on Forbes.

Cover image credit: Calvin Klein

Cléa Emery

Writer at Luxury Society

Cléa Emery is writer at Luxury Society. Based in Geneva, Cléa was previously part of the Digital Marketing team of Solar Impulse. She now contributes to managing the Luxury Society platform. Cléa is also Marketing & Communication specialist at DLG, the parent company of Luxury Society.

CONSUMERS

What We’ve Read: Calvin Klein to Close Luxury Collections Business

by

Cléa Emery

|

This is the featured image caption
Credit : This is the featured image credit

Luxury Society’s selection of news articles that are not to be missed this week.

Over the last decade, collaborations between luxury brands and contemporary artists have gone beyond mere artistic partnerships towards a new kind of luxury branding.

PARIS – Art and fashion have always developed side by side, for fashion, like art, often gives visual expression to the cultural zeitgeist. During the 1920s, Salvador Dalí created dresses for Coco Chanel and Elsa Schiapparelli. In the 1930s, Ferragamo’s shoes commissioned designs for advertisements from Futurist painter Lucio Venna, while Gianni Versace commissioned works from artists such as Alighiero Boetti and Roy Lichtenstein for the launch of his collections. Yves Saint Laurent’s vast art collection, recently auctioned at Christie’s in Paris, testified to his great love of art and revealed the influence of a variety of artists on his own designs.

In the 1980s, relationships between luxury brands and artists were advanced when Alain Dominique Perrin created the Fondation Cartier. In the Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain, a book marking the foundation’s 20th anniversary, Perrin says he makes “a connection between all the different sorts of arts, and luxury goods are a kind of art. Luxury goods are handicrafts of art, applied art.”

The Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemparain building in Paris

Luxury Society’s selection of news articles that are not to be missed this week.

1. Calvin Klein to close luxury collections business

The American fashion brand Calvin Klein has announced that it is shutting its luxury collections business. It will instead focus on its existing categories, including denim and underwear.

Read this on The Guardian.

2. Luxury fashion continues its mission to support women

As the world turns to embrace women and push for equality, luxury brands are participating in full force for this year’s International Women’s Day to show that supporting the gender is an integral part of their businesses.

Read this on Luxury Daily.

3. How to create an authentic luxury experience for millennials

Recently, a CEO of a luxury brand asked me if I would agree that for millennials, especially in China and Asia, luxury is all about experiences, suggesting that brand, quality, and craftsmanship were not nearly as important. That in today’s digital — everything all of the time — world, it’s all about connection.

Read this on Jing Daily.

4. Luxury Defies China Slowdown Fears

From Richemont to Kering, some of the biggest names in luxury reported strong growth in their end-of-year results, with the majority citing the Chinese market as a key driver.

Read this on Business of Fashion.

5. How What Goes Around Comes Around is attracting millennials to buy vintage

What Goes Around Comes Around (WGACA) is making luxury vintage cool again for the millennial buyer. Known as the premier destination for the finest collectible luxury vintage from around the world with an unrivaled selection of designer accessories and clothing from brands such as Chanel, Hermès, Louis Vuitton, Gucci, Versace, Dior and Fendi.

Read this on Forbes.

Cover image credit: Calvin Klein

Cléa Emery

Writer at Luxury Society

Cléa Emery is writer at Luxury Society. Based in Geneva, Cléa was previously part of the Digital Marketing team of Solar Impulse. She now contributes to managing the Luxury Society platform. Cléa is also Marketing & Communication specialist at DLG, the parent company of Luxury Society.

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