CONSUMERS

Balenciaga Holds Onto Top Spot as World’s Hottest Brand

by

Limei Hoang

|

The Lost Tape by Balenciaga.
Credit: Courtesy of Balenciaga.

The French fashion house continued to benefit from its success in the second half of 2021, helped by its collaboration with The Simpsons, its latest autumn/winter collection, and its designer Demna being honoured at the CFDA awards.

Balenciaga has once again claimed first place as the world’s hottest brand, according to global fashion shopping platform Lyst, which compiles a quarterly report that ranks the most popular brands and products. It was followed by Gucci, Prada, Louis Vuitton, and Moncler respectively.

For Prada, the fourth quarter marked the first time it held the position of third place, the highest it has ever placed in the Lyst Index, which cited the brand’s viral bucket hat challenge on TikTok amongst the reasons for its boost in popularity.

The Lyst Index for Q4 2021.
Credit: Courtesy of Lyst.

Lyst, which analyses the online shopping behaviour of more than 160 million shoppers a year – who browse and buy fashion across 17,000 designers and stores online – compiles the index as a way to measure which brands are striking a chord with shoppers each quarter, taking int account Lyst shopper behaviour, including conversion rates and sales. It also includes Google search data, as well as social media mentions and engagement statistics worldwide over a three month period.

The report found that the influence of TV series and films made a significant impact on fashion lovers’ wishlists. Gucci’s 1953 Horsebit loafers were listed as the most wanted men’s product in the fourth quarter, helped by their appearance in the film House of Gucci, and the Omega Seamaster Diver 300 Watch took second place, no doubt helped by its role in the most recent James Bond film.

“Ever since the pandemic started, there has been a growing interest in screen style,” said Evi Berberi, Communications Manager at Lyst.

“Shoppers have spent a lot more time at home and in their own company, which is why they are turning to movies and tv shows as their fashion inspiration. Shows such as House of Gucci or Emily in Paris offer a form of escapism, which is reflected in and expressed through fashion,” she added.

Unsurprisingly, seasonality helped demand for technical outerwear and footwear climb, as well as cosy pillow shoes. And some shoppers also sought out party wear for the festive season with Nensi Dojaka’s sheer tulle bustier top ranking in sixth place in women’s hottest products and Saint Laurent’s 68 crystal-embellished boots in eighth place.

For the full findings from The Lyst Index, please click here.

Welcome to Data Digest, our breakdown of the latest data releases and reports focused on the luxury industry.

Limei Hoang
Limei Hoang

Senior Editor, Luxury Society

Limei Hoang is a senior editor at Luxury Society, based in Geneva. She was formerly an associate editor at the Business of Fashion in London. Previously, Limei spent six years at Reuters as a journalist, and she has also written for the BBC, The Independent, and New Statesman.

CONSUMERS

Balenciaga Holds Onto Top Spot as World’s Hottest Brand

by

Limei Hoang

|

The Lost Tape by Balenciaga.
Credit : Courtesy of Balenciaga.

The French fashion house continued to benefit from its success in the second half of 2021, helped by its collaboration with The Simpsons, its latest autumn/winter collection, and its designer Demna being honoured at the CFDA awards.

Balenciaga has once again claimed first place as the world’s hottest brand, according to global fashion shopping platform Lyst, which compiles a quarterly report that ranks the most popular brands and products. It was followed by Gucci, Prada, Louis Vuitton, and Moncler respectively.

For Prada, the fourth quarter marked the first time it held the position of third place, the highest it has ever placed in the Lyst Index, which cited the brand’s viral bucket hat challenge on TikTok amongst the reasons for its boost in popularity.

The Lyst Index for Q4 2021.
Credit: Courtesy of Lyst.

Lyst, which analyses the online shopping behaviour of more than 160 million shoppers a year – who browse and buy fashion across 17,000 designers and stores online – compiles the index as a way to measure which brands are striking a chord with shoppers each quarter, taking int account Lyst shopper behaviour, including conversion rates and sales. It also includes Google search data, as well as social media mentions and engagement statistics worldwide over a three month period.

The report found that the influence of TV series and films made a significant impact on fashion lovers’ wishlists. Gucci’s 1953 Horsebit loafers were listed as the most wanted men’s product in the fourth quarter, helped by their appearance in the film House of Gucci, and the Omega Seamaster Diver 300 Watch took second place, no doubt helped by its role in the most recent James Bond film.

“Ever since the pandemic started, there has been a growing interest in screen style,” said Evi Berberi, Communications Manager at Lyst.

“Shoppers have spent a lot more time at home and in their own company, which is why they are turning to movies and tv shows as their fashion inspiration. Shows such as House of Gucci or Emily in Paris offer a form of escapism, which is reflected in and expressed through fashion,” she added.

Unsurprisingly, seasonality helped demand for technical outerwear and footwear climb, as well as cosy pillow shoes. And some shoppers also sought out party wear for the festive season with Nensi Dojaka’s sheer tulle bustier top ranking in sixth place in women’s hottest products and Saint Laurent’s 68 crystal-embellished boots in eighth place.

For the full findings from The Lyst Index, please click here.

Welcome to Data Digest, our breakdown of the latest data releases and reports focused on the luxury industry.

Limei Hoang
Limei Hoang

Senior Editor, Luxury Society

Limei Hoang is a senior editor at Luxury Society, based in Geneva. She was formerly an associate editor at the Business of Fashion in London. Previously, Limei spent six years at Reuters as a journalist, and she has also written for the BBC, The Independent, and New Statesman.

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