CONSUMERS

Innovation in a New Field: Pairing up Chinese food and Bordeaux wines

by

Nathalie Omori

|

This is the featured image caption
Credit: This is the featured image credit
Nathalie Omori, Senior Partner of Zhenji, a marketing firm devoted to Chinese HNWIs, reports on the initiative launched by Zhenji, Target & the Chinese Luxury Magazine to match and market…

Over the last decade, collaborations between luxury brands and contemporary artists have gone beyond mere artistic partnerships towards a new kind of luxury branding.

PARIS – Art and fashion have always developed side by side, for fashion, like art, often gives visual expression to the cultural zeitgeist. During the 1920s, Salvador Dalí created dresses for Coco Chanel and Elsa Schiapparelli. In the 1930s, Ferragamo’s shoes commissioned designs for advertisements from Futurist painter Lucio Venna, while Gianni Versace commissioned works from artists such as Alighiero Boetti and Roy Lichtenstein for the launch of his collections. Yves Saint Laurent’s vast art collection, recently auctioned at Christie’s in Paris, testified to his great love of art and revealed the influence of a variety of artists on his own designs.

In the 1980s, relationships between luxury brands and artists were advanced when Alain Dominique Perrin created the Fondation Cartier. In the Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain, a book marking the foundation’s 20th anniversary, Perrin says he makes “a connection between all the different sorts of arts, and luxury goods are a kind of art. Luxury goods are handicrafts of art, applied art.”

The Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemparain building in Paris

Nathalie Omori, Senior Partner of Zhenji, a marketing firm devoted to Chinese HNWIs, reports on the initiative launched by Zhenji, Target & the Chinese Luxury Magazine to match and market Chinese food and Bordeaux wines

Nathalie Omori, Senior Partner of Zhenji, a marketing firm devoted to Chinese HNWIs, reports on the initiative launched by Zhenji, Target & the Chinese Luxury Magazine to match and market Chinese food and Bordeaux wines

In China, 80 % of the wines and spirits will be drunk during a meal, a chinese meal of course for Chinese people do mostly eat their own cooking which has been given to them by the Gods. This is the reason why it is so important, concerning the wines that would like to be referenced in this country also, to work on the wines/chinese dishes pairing in terms of marketing. Here is the complex challenge in which the great wines of Bordeaux, the marketing agency Zhenji and the luxury magazine Target set off.

For Zhenji, the first thing to do was to contact the Shan brothers from the “Bonheur du Palais” in Bordeaux which is today one of the top chinese restaurants in the world not counting China. Then different classics from the best chinese cooking were selected. The ultimate purpose being that, when a client orders the well-known “Three-ducks-stuffed Duck”, a classsic of the Suzhou’s cooking, he immediately thinks of the great wine of Bordeaux to match: a Chateau Cheval Blanc. Helene Yuan, the restaurant’s wine waitress, tasted the wines and the dishes to combine them. Sent by Target, Sam Wong, a star of culinary design in Shanghai and gastronomic consultant for every restaurant in the real-estate complex of Xintiandi, put the finishing touches to the food presentation while Yoshi Omori, the photographer, was artistically matching damask tablecloths with luxury tableware and glasses to enhance food and wines.

The editor Lin Tian for his part, interviewed the chefs about their recipes or the precise vocabulary to be used in this dishes/wines pairing. For Tommy Shan, the restaurant owner, did actually create some special words to define these new pairings, words that will have to feature in the text facing each picture.

Today, Target is working on this special issue which will come out on January 5th 2011, the chinese New Year Day traditionally celebrated by many families or friends feasts where great wines of Bordeaux could be offered or drunk. But this Target special issue would also be very useful because, today, chinese restaurants have no sommelier, no-one to be consulted about wich wine could taste best with the chosen menu; a lot of personal Chinese gourmets would probably appreciate this kind of information too.

Those who listen to malicious gossips like that, in China, ginger has been added to the great Chateau Petrus or that some Chateau Lafite has been drunk down in one will surely laugh, thinking we are casting pearls before swine… Whatever happens, wine marketing in China will have to take the time-honoured chinese cooking rites into account.

Nathalie Omori, Senior Partner, Zhenji

Nathalie Omori

Senior partner

I am a specialist of Luxury Consumption in China by HNWI. I make Market Research, Consumer Insights, Media Planning including Chinese Internet, and works with Chinese Media to develop luxury consumption in China. My clients are main of the famous European Luxury Groups including LVMH, Moët Hennessy, Richemont Group, Remy Cointreau or Pernod Ricard. I also work for many brands from Cartier to Guerlain,as well as Cognac Hine or Château d’Yquem, …

CONSUMERS

Innovation in a New Field: Pairing up Chinese food and Bordeaux wines

by

Nathalie Omori

|

This is the featured image caption
Credit : This is the featured image credit
Nathalie Omori, Senior Partner of Zhenji, a marketing firm devoted to Chinese HNWIs, reports on the initiative launched by Zhenji, Target & the Chinese Luxury Magazine to match and market…

Over the last decade, collaborations between luxury brands and contemporary artists have gone beyond mere artistic partnerships towards a new kind of luxury branding.

PARIS – Art and fashion have always developed side by side, for fashion, like art, often gives visual expression to the cultural zeitgeist. During the 1920s, Salvador Dalí created dresses for Coco Chanel and Elsa Schiapparelli. In the 1930s, Ferragamo’s shoes commissioned designs for advertisements from Futurist painter Lucio Venna, while Gianni Versace commissioned works from artists such as Alighiero Boetti and Roy Lichtenstein for the launch of his collections. Yves Saint Laurent’s vast art collection, recently auctioned at Christie’s in Paris, testified to his great love of art and revealed the influence of a variety of artists on his own designs.

In the 1980s, relationships between luxury brands and artists were advanced when Alain Dominique Perrin created the Fondation Cartier. In the Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain, a book marking the foundation’s 20th anniversary, Perrin says he makes “a connection between all the different sorts of arts, and luxury goods are a kind of art. Luxury goods are handicrafts of art, applied art.”

The Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemparain building in Paris

Nathalie Omori, Senior Partner of Zhenji, a marketing firm devoted to Chinese HNWIs, reports on the initiative launched by Zhenji, Target & the Chinese Luxury Magazine to match and market Chinese food and Bordeaux wines

Nathalie Omori, Senior Partner of Zhenji, a marketing firm devoted to Chinese HNWIs, reports on the initiative launched by Zhenji, Target & the Chinese Luxury Magazine to match and market Chinese food and Bordeaux wines

In China, 80 % of the wines and spirits will be drunk during a meal, a chinese meal of course for Chinese people do mostly eat their own cooking which has been given to them by the Gods. This is the reason why it is so important, concerning the wines that would like to be referenced in this country also, to work on the wines/chinese dishes pairing in terms of marketing. Here is the complex challenge in which the great wines of Bordeaux, the marketing agency Zhenji and the luxury magazine Target set off.

For Zhenji, the first thing to do was to contact the Shan brothers from the “Bonheur du Palais” in Bordeaux which is today one of the top chinese restaurants in the world not counting China. Then different classics from the best chinese cooking were selected. The ultimate purpose being that, when a client orders the well-known “Three-ducks-stuffed Duck”, a classsic of the Suzhou’s cooking, he immediately thinks of the great wine of Bordeaux to match: a Chateau Cheval Blanc. Helene Yuan, the restaurant’s wine waitress, tasted the wines and the dishes to combine them. Sent by Target, Sam Wong, a star of culinary design in Shanghai and gastronomic consultant for every restaurant in the real-estate complex of Xintiandi, put the finishing touches to the food presentation while Yoshi Omori, the photographer, was artistically matching damask tablecloths with luxury tableware and glasses to enhance food and wines.

The editor Lin Tian for his part, interviewed the chefs about their recipes or the precise vocabulary to be used in this dishes/wines pairing. For Tommy Shan, the restaurant owner, did actually create some special words to define these new pairings, words that will have to feature in the text facing each picture.

Today, Target is working on this special issue which will come out on January 5th 2011, the chinese New Year Day traditionally celebrated by many families or friends feasts where great wines of Bordeaux could be offered or drunk. But this Target special issue would also be very useful because, today, chinese restaurants have no sommelier, no-one to be consulted about wich wine could taste best with the chosen menu; a lot of personal Chinese gourmets would probably appreciate this kind of information too.

Those who listen to malicious gossips like that, in China, ginger has been added to the great Chateau Petrus or that some Chateau Lafite has been drunk down in one will surely laugh, thinking we are casting pearls before swine… Whatever happens, wine marketing in China will have to take the time-honoured chinese cooking rites into account.

Nathalie Omori, Senior Partner, Zhenji

Nathalie Omori

Senior partner

I am a specialist of Luxury Consumption in China by HNWI. I make Market Research, Consumer Insights, Media Planning including Chinese Internet, and works with Chinese Media to develop luxury consumption in China. My clients are main of the famous European Luxury Groups including LVMH, Moët Hennessy, Richemont Group, Remy Cointreau or Pernod Ricard. I also work for many brands from Cartier to Guerlain,as well as Cognac Hine or Château d’Yquem, …

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