CONSUMERS

China Luxury Boom Moves Inland

by

Lucy Archibald

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This is the featured image caption
Credit: This is the featured image credit

Luxury brands need to look beyond the obvious locations as China’s wealthy population grows and develops inland too

Over the last decade, collaborations between luxury brands and contemporary artists have gone beyond mere artistic partnerships towards a new kind of luxury branding.

PARIS – Art and fashion have always developed side by side, for fashion, like art, often gives visual expression to the cultural zeitgeist. During the 1920s, Salvador Dalí created dresses for Coco Chanel and Elsa Schiapparelli. In the 1930s, Ferragamo’s shoes commissioned designs for advertisements from Futurist painter Lucio Venna, while Gianni Versace commissioned works from artists such as Alighiero Boetti and Roy Lichtenstein for the launch of his collections. Yves Saint Laurent’s vast art collection, recently auctioned at Christie’s in Paris, testified to his great love of art and revealed the influence of a variety of artists on his own designs.

In the 1980s, relationships between luxury brands and artists were advanced when Alain Dominique Perrin created the Fondation Cartier. In the Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain, a book marking the foundation’s 20th anniversary, Perrin says he makes “a connection between all the different sorts of arts, and luxury goods are a kind of art. Luxury goods are handicrafts of art, applied art.”

The Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemparain building in Paris

Luxury brands need to look beyond the obvious locations as China’s wealthy population grows and develops inland too

Luxury brands need to look beyond the obvious locations as China’s wealthy population grows and develops inland too

So far luxury brands have tended to locate themselves in China’s four wealthiest coastal cities, but much of the 25% growth in luxury spending which is expected will happen in a more westerly direction. Many of the country’s growing number of billionaires (currently there are around 80) are also in these locations. The Chinese spend 9 billion per year on luxury goods, so this is a market well worth thinking carefully about.

Lucy Archibald
Lucy Archibald

Associate Editor

CONSUMERS

China Luxury Boom Moves Inland

by

Lucy Archibald

|

This is the featured image caption
Credit : This is the featured image credit

Luxury brands need to look beyond the obvious locations as China’s wealthy population grows and develops inland too

Over the last decade, collaborations between luxury brands and contemporary artists have gone beyond mere artistic partnerships towards a new kind of luxury branding.

PARIS – Art and fashion have always developed side by side, for fashion, like art, often gives visual expression to the cultural zeitgeist. During the 1920s, Salvador Dalí created dresses for Coco Chanel and Elsa Schiapparelli. In the 1930s, Ferragamo’s shoes commissioned designs for advertisements from Futurist painter Lucio Venna, while Gianni Versace commissioned works from artists such as Alighiero Boetti and Roy Lichtenstein for the launch of his collections. Yves Saint Laurent’s vast art collection, recently auctioned at Christie’s in Paris, testified to his great love of art and revealed the influence of a variety of artists on his own designs.

In the 1980s, relationships between luxury brands and artists were advanced when Alain Dominique Perrin created the Fondation Cartier. In the Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemporain, a book marking the foundation’s 20th anniversary, Perrin says he makes “a connection between all the different sorts of arts, and luxury goods are a kind of art. Luxury goods are handicrafts of art, applied art.”

The Fondation Cartier pour l’Art Contemparain building in Paris

Luxury brands need to look beyond the obvious locations as China’s wealthy population grows and develops inland too

Luxury brands need to look beyond the obvious locations as China’s wealthy population grows and develops inland too

So far luxury brands have tended to locate themselves in China’s four wealthiest coastal cities, but much of the 25% growth in luxury spending which is expected will happen in a more westerly direction. Many of the country’s growing number of billionaires (currently there are around 80) are also in these locations. The Chinese spend 9 billion per year on luxury goods, so this is a market well worth thinking carefully about.

Lucy Archibald
Lucy Archibald

Associate Editor

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